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Esterhazy High School
Excellence, Honour, Spirit
Dec 06, 2021
School Day 4
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LEAP

What is LEAP?

The LEAP program was established in 2011 to help students who were not succeeding in school and/or were at risk of dropping out of school. LEAP was initially modelled after a "store front" school focused on academic, social and life skills.

Presently, LEAP is much more than a "store front." It has evolved into a "Flex-Ed" model which accommodates a wide range of students completing a variety of courses and programs. Currently, LEAP offers a variety of school-based distance learning courses, modified programming, and tutorial support for students. LEAP also oversees students taking GSSD Distance Learning courses and those who require Credit Rescue and Credit Recovery at the end of a semester.

Functions of LEAP

  • Individualized support/course facilitation
  • Modified programming
  • Flex-Ed courses
  • Distance Learning supervision
  • Credit Rescue/Credit Recovery
  • Various high school electives

Expectations

Course Offerings

  • ELA A11: This is the modified version of ELA A10. This course explores two units: The Challenges of Life, and the Mysteries of Life. This modified course will focus on comprehension and response to the literature. (no pre-requisite)
  • ELA 21: This is the modified version of ELA20. This course explores two units: Beginning and Becoming, and Establishing and Realizing. These two units focus on the growing and maturing process in humans. (pre-requisite ELA A11/B11)
  • ELA A31: This is the modified version of ELA A30. This course explores two units in Canadian Literature: the Canadian Identity and Canadian Landscapes. (pre-requisite ELA20)
  • ELA B31: This is the modified version of ELA B30. It focuses on British and world literature. (pre-requisite ELA20)
  • ENSC 21: This is the modified version of ESC20. Students will learn how to examine local and global environmental issues from a systems perspective while considering the effects of human actions and a growing global population on the climate and environment. Also, this course looks at the effects of the environment on human health. Finally, this course explores the mechanisms and importance of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. (pre-requisite SCI11)
  • ENT 30: The aim of Entrepreneurship 30 is to provide students with opportunities to acquire knowledge and develop skills necessary to plan and begin a venture, and to appreciate the role that entrepreneurs play in our society and economy. (no pre-requisite)
  • CWE 20: The aim of Career and Work Exploration is to provide students with opportunities to develop and enhance the knowledge, skills and abilities to manage their life career development. Students will be able to expand their awareness, to explore and to experience various work roles through work-based learning experiences. Each level requires students to choose optional modules to complete, as well as OHS course modules. (no pre-requisite)
  • CWE 30A: The aim of Career and Work Exploration is to provide students with opportunities to develop and enhance the knowledge, skills and abilities to manage their life career development. Students will be able to expand their awareness, to explore and to experience various work roles through work-based learning experiences. Each level requires students to choose optional modules to complete, as well as OHS course modules. (no pre-requisite)
  • CWE 30B: The aim of Career and Work Exploration is to provide students with opportunities to develop and enhance the knowledge, skills and abilities to manage their life career development. Students will be able to expand their awareness, to explore and to experience various work roles through work-based learning experiences. Each level requires students to choose optional modules to complete, as well as OHS course modules. (no pre-requisite)
  • FLIT 20: This course focuses on seven areas: earning, saving, spending, borrowing, sharing, investing, and protecting. The course is an introduction to financial issues and decisions that students may already be facing and addresses topics such as the value of money, the importance of decision making as it applies to finances, information security, budgeting fundamentals, maintaining accurate financial records, the concept of interest, and career opportunities in the financial industry. (no pre-requisite)
  • FLIT 30: This course focuses on seven areas: earning, saving, spending, borrowing, sharing, investing, and protecting. The course addresses more complex financial issues and decisions that students may already be facing while highlighting others they are likely to face within the first few years of graduating high school. It touches upon more complex issues such as home ownership; debt management, including bankruptcy; purchasing and leasing property including vehicles; and retirement planning which are part of a lifelong financial journey. (no pre-requisite)
  • HIS 11: This is the modified version of History 10. It looks at political structures through the French Revolution, political structures through the Industrial Revolution, Imperialism, Nationalism, and the cause of WWI. (no pre-requisite)
  • HIS 21: This is the modified version of HIS20. This read and respond program looks at Canada’s role in WWI, the Interwar Period, and WWII. (pre-requisite HIS11)
  • HIS 31: This is the modified version of HIS30. This read and respond program looks at Canadian History from first contact to the modern period. (pre-requisite HIS11)
  • HSC 21: This is the modified version of HSC20. Students will look at the health science field from holistic and analytic perspectives to provide a basis for making sound personal health choices. Students will study the basic anatomy and physiology of the human They will also look at the role of nutrition and metabolism. Lastly, students will also investigate the range of health science careers and post-secondary programs available in Saskatchewan. (pre-requisite SCI11)
  • IND 30: Interior Design allows students to gain an appreciation of the design fundamentals that form the foundation by which all design is judged. Learning how to manipulate and apply the tools of design in a variety of situations in the home is a major focus throughout the course of study. Opportunities for creative application of design fundamentals are provided in the Application of Design module. Interior design components and treatments are examined as they apply to design interiors in residential and commercial buildings. Walls, ceilings, floors, windows, doors, furniture, and accessories are discussed in relation to application principles and construction studied in the course. Decorating trends from the past to today are discussed in relation to availability, use, selection, and practicality of materials as students seek to evaluate what is good design. (no pre-requisite)
  • KIN 30: Students will explore the world of sport performance and will develop a greater understanding of the body and how it functions. Kinesiology generally refers to an individual’s physical functioning and is viewed as the umbrella covering nutrition, sports medicine, sports psychology, exercise physiology, growth and development, sport leadership, and sport ethics. (no pre-requisite)
  • LTR20: Life Transitions looks at personal improvement. Units include goals, action plans, self-esteem, relationships, time management, and life balance.
  • LTR30: Life Transitions 30 is a continuation of LTR20. Units include life roles, health self care, conflict, money management, independent living, and parenting.
  • MAT 21: This is the modified version of MWA10. (no pre-requisite)
  • MHA 10: Mental Health and Addictions 10 Course is delivered online through the portal with students reflecting on and responding to various videos and readings. Topics explored in the course include Emotions, Self-Esteem, Healthy Communication and Relationships, Mental Health Disorders, Addictions, Grief, Trauma, Suicide, and Therapeutic Supports. Throughout the course, students will consider how mental health and addictions affect the quality of life and the decisions people make.
  • MWA 10: MWA 10 covers many concepts that relate to real life math. Videos are posted on the portal for each lesson/unit along with assignments for students to print and complete. Units include Unit Pricing and Currency Exchange, Earning and Income, Unit Conversions, Angles and Parallel Lines, Similarity of Figures and Trigonometry of Right Triangles.
  • MWA 20: MWA 20 covers many concepts that relate to real life math. Sample questions/videos are posted on the portal for each unit that correspond with each unit in the student workbook. Units include Slope, Graphs, Surface Area, Volume and Capacity, Trigonometry, Financial Services and Personal Budgets.
  • SCI 11: This is the modified version of SCI10. The four units students will explore include Climate and ecosystems, Force and motion, chemical reactions, and careers in science. (no pre-requisite)
  • WLM 30: The aim of Wildlife Management 20 is to provide students with the opportunity to study beliefs and attitudes about wildlife. Units of study include interactions of wildlife and society, managing wildlife, and issues in wildlife. The intent of this course is to raise an awareness of the importance of wildlife in the daily life of an individual and for society as a whole. (no pre-requisite)